A Treasured Vessel: Family Bible Journaling Project

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Olive oil was important to the people of the Bible. It was used for cooking and for light. The oil would be kept in jars of pottery, or lamps. Which was more important? The oil, or the vessel that held the oil?

treasured vesselIn this lesson of The Family Bible Journaling Project, the term “vessel” is explored. Keep this question in mind: How does the Lord use this metaphor to explain the gospel throughout the Old and New Testaments?

If you are new to this Bible Lesson Series, be sure to read the introduction to answer any questions you might have. Because this is a family activity, gather in an area which allows for you to “circle up” and see each other. We sat at the kitchen table.

Be sure to pray as a group before beginning.

Materials: clay jar or vase {any type of container that can hold water will work}

Time: 20-30 minutes

Background: (for older children or adults) Jeremiah 18 tells us that God sent Jeremiah to a potter’s house. Jeremiah was to watch as the potter threw the clay, spun the wheel, created the vessel, and then destroyed it because it was not to the potter’s liking. God was using a object lesson to teach Jeremiah what his plans were for the nation of Israel. This lesson is important for us to know because the New Testament teaches us about being a vessel for Christ.

Background Video: Think about the scripture from Jeremiah as you watch THIS VIDEO of an Indian potter creating a vessel.

Brainstorm: Look at the vessel, or container. For what is it used? What can be put into it? What happens if it breaks? Can it be put back together? Would it still be useful?

Scripture: Read 2 Kings 4:1-7, then read 2 Corinthians 4:7.

Think: What problem was the woman facing? Who does she go to? What was his solution? Did the woman obey? What miracle happened? How was the problem solved? What would be an “earthen vessel”? What was the treasure for the woman? If our bodies are considered as earthen vessels, what would be our treasure? Where does our power come from?

Journal: Take 10-15 minutes of quiet time to write out thoughts. Younger children can draw pictures, while older children can write and doodle. Allow for an atmosphere of prayer. When younger children are finished, ask them to tell you about what they put in their journals. You might want to write down their thoughts.

Our Examples of Bible Journaling:

vessel1Sweet Cheeks had a hard time with this object lesson. She could articulate that we were to be vessels and that Jesus was the one to fill us. I think she got stuck when I read the extension passage from below. Being a vessel of honor vs. dishonor seemed confusing. But she knew she wanted to honor God and be a vessel.

vessel2RB focused on the potter and the clay image. He understood that he was the vessel and that Jesus was the one who makes us and changes us.

vessel3This is mine.

Take It Deeper: (for older children and adults) Read 2 Timothy 2:20-26. What do these scriptures add to your previous thoughts? What do you learn about vessels?

I’d love to see examples of your journal entries! If you email your entries to me I’ll be sure to share them with others to encourage them in their own journaling activity! Everyone has different gifts, and I’m not much of an artist, but I know your journals will be brilliant!

Send your entry to futureflyingsaucers@klopex.com.

Thoughts? Please share!